One in eight older persons in Canada, according to recent large-scale research that included more than 20,000, experienced their first episode of depression during the epidemic.

The statistics were significantly worse for people who had previously struggled with depression. Nearly half (45 per cent) of this population reported having depression by the fall of 2020.

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The first comprehensive study to examine research on the mental health of children and young people using evidence from before and during COVID-19 discovered an effect on mental health that could lead to an increase in demand for support services.

The research, led by the University of Exeter and the University of Cambridge, is the first to examine research that has information on young people's mental health before and during the pandemic. The study gives more insight into changes in mental health of children and young people of various ages across the globe during the pandemic.

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LEHTIKUVA

According to a study, individuals who have already been infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, still benefit from a vaccination as well, with 60% to 94% protection against reinfection, depending on the variation.

A new study led by Katrine Finderup Nielsen at Statens Serum Institut, Denmark, reports these findings in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine.

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According to recent research from the Youth Development Institute at the University of Georgia, stress may not be a bad thing when it comes to brain functioning. The study was published in Neuropsychologia.

The study found that low to moderate levels of stress improves working memory, the short-term information people use to complete everyday tasks like remembering someone's phone number or recalling directions on how to get to a specific location.

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According to research, major societal and political events can have a significant impact on psychological health, as well as sleep and emotional well-being. While conventional wisdom holds that highly anticipated events, such as elections, can cause stress and disrupt well-being.

Now, researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and colleagues show how major sociopolitical events can have global impacts on sleep that are associated with significant fluctuations in the public's collective mood, well-being, and alcohol consumption.

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In her PhD thesis, MD Elina Bergman examined factors associated with quality of life and self-reported work ability among the employees of the city of Pori. Sleep quality was found to be an especially important factor connected with both quality of life and work ability. In addition, ideal cardiovascular health as well as frequent use of healthy food items was associated with good quality of life. Occupational stress, chronic illnesses, depressive symptoms, anxiety and overweight were associated with poorer quality of life.

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World Sight Day, celebrated on October 13th, marks an opportunity to raise awareness about retinal diseases and showcase the community's commitment to supporting the millions of people nationwide living with preventable vision loss.

The theme for this year World Sight Day is 'Love Your Eyes,' reinforcing the significance of treating one's eyes with the care they deserve.

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October is International Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and a recent survey found that most women are unaware of the unusual symptoms of inflammatory breast cancer, a particularly deadly and aggressive form of the disease.

The survey was commissioned by The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC - James).

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October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. In October 1985, the first organized movement on the dangers of breast cancer occurred in the United States, marking the origination of October as we know it today. Campaigns are organized annually to inform the public about the disease, the importance of regular mammograms, and methods of prevention and early detection.

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According to a new study by Queen's University Belfast researchers, dogs can smell anxiety in humans through their sweat and breath.

The research findings have been published in PLOS ONE. The study was carried out by Clara Wilson (PhD researcher) and Kerry Campbell (MSc student) in the School of Psychology. They were supervised by Catherine Reeve, with support on collecting the human physiological measures from Zachary Petzel.

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Lower levels of health, increasing financial pressure and a significant degree of unmet healthcare: these are the findings of the fifth round of the Living, working and COVID-19 e-survey: Living in a new era of uncertainty – a report that presents an overview of responses from over 200,000 people across all five rounds of the e-survey, which took place from spring 2020 to spring 2022.

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