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Finland’s opposition parties have demonstrated their lack of understanding of how jobs are created with their latest interpellation, says Harri Jaskari (NCP).
Finland’s opposition parties have demonstrated their lack of understanding of how jobs are created with their latest interpellation, says Harri Jaskari (NCP).

 

Opposition parties have demonstrated their lack of understanding of how jobs are created with their latest interpellation against the proposals drafted by the government to improve the employment situation in Finland, says Harri Jaskari (NCP).

He points out that the opposition parties have singled out two proposals for criticism despite the fact that the proposals are part of a larger package of measures.

The opposition draws in its interpellation attention especially to the proposal to allow businesses with no more than 20 staff to lay off employees on personal grounds and the proposal to allow businesses to hire under 30-year-old job seekers who have been jobless for at least three months on fixed-term contracts without justification.

Its claim that making it easier to lay off staff on personal grounds would destroy the labour markets is incredulous, according to Jaskari.

“No one hires employees just to be able to lay them off later. For employers, the value of a good employee cannot be measured in gold. When the threshold to hire is lower, businesses tend to hire more,” he explains.

He reminds that laying off individual employees – even ones who do not bother working – on personal rounds is currently extremely difficult in Finland. “Employee protection is strong even in such circumstances: the grounds for lay-offs are met only after a very serious violation or negligence of duties,” he says.

Jaskari expresses his confidence that the proposal would succeed in encouraging businesses to hire more employees.

The Federation of Finnish Enterprises, he points out, has conducted a study indicating that 37 per cent of businesses, including 74 per cent of microbusinesses, would consider hiring new employees if the proposal was carried out.

Finland is presently home to roughly 270,000 businesses with no more than 20 employees.

Jaskari also estimates that the opposition parties are on the wrong track when it comes to the youth unemployment situation.

“The new possibility to hire on fixed-term contracts would concern young people who have already been hit by the curse of long-term unemployment. The longer the unemployment period for young people, the harder it is to find a job and the higher the risk of social exclusion. This would improve – not weaken – the possibilities of young people who find themselves unemployed on a long-term basis,” he says.

Aleksi Teivainen – HT
Photo: Vesa Moilanen – Lehtikuva
Source: Uusi Suomi

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