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Motorists are liable for ensuring that their driving beam lights are in good working condition.DARKENING autumn evenings and the fast-approaching winter put motorists on their toes once again. Lights or indicators must always be used while driving, but daytime running lamps can only be used in conditions of good visibility.

High-beam or driving beam lights must be used when driving in the dark or in poor visibility due to fog or rain, for example. Their indiscriminate distribution of light can dazzle road users coming in the opposite direction, however. Motorists are liable for ensuring that their driving beam lights are in good working condition.

Winter tyres are mandatory in the winter, and must be fitted by 1 December at the latest. This winter they can be fitted from 1 November. They must be removed in the spring by 16 April at the latest. If weather conditions require, winter tyres can be used on all vehicles at other times also. Winter tyres have to be fitted on all vehicles by 1 December at the latest, and have to be used during December, January, and February at the minimum. Foreign-registered vehicles are also subject to these legal requirements.

Winter tyres can be studded, or non-studded. The holding power of studless winter tyres is at its best on snowy roads, whereas studded tyres have a better grip on icy surfaces. If studded winter tyres are used, they must be fitted to all the wheels.

Winter tyres have to be
fitted on all vehicles by
1 December at the latest
and must be used
during December, January,
and February at a
minimum.

When driving on newly studded tyres, it’s important to allow time for them to “wear in”, which in practice means to avoid abrupt braking or abrupt changes of speed for the first few hundred kilometres of driving with the new tyres. This helps to minimise loss of studs, and thus prolongs the working life of the tyres.

HELSINKI TIMES
LEHTIKUVA - SARI GUSTAFSSON

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