Domestic
Tools
Typography
A photograph dated 7 November, 2016, showing the construction site of Hanhikivi 1 in Pyhäjoki, North Ostrobothnia. Fennovoima has begun preparing the construction project despite not yet receiving a building permit from the central administration.
A photograph dated 7 November, 2016, showing the construction site of Hanhikivi 1 in Pyhäjoki, North Ostrobothnia. Fennovoima has begun preparing the construction project despite not yet receiving a building permit from the central administration.

 

Fennovoima has conceded that it will not receive a building permit for its nuclear power plant in Pyhäjoki, North Ostrobothnia, in 2018.

“We have examined how our work has progressed and decided to push back the objective of receiving the permit to 2019. The plant supplier has needed more time than initially expected to take into account the standards and legislation in Finland,” Toni Hemminki, the managing director of Fennovoima, said in a press release on Monday.

The Hanhikivi Nuclear Power Plant will be supplied by RAOS Project, a subsidiary of Rosatom, a Russian state-owned atomic energy company.

Related posts:

The building permit is conditional on the positive outcome of technical safety inspections by the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland (STUK).

“Because submitting the documents has taken more time than expected in the first two years [of the project], STUK has yet been able to conduct its inspections to the extent it had planned on,” explains Hemminki.

Petteri Tiippana, the head of STUK, revealed a few months ago that the nuclear energy consortium has yet to submit all of the documents required to conduct the safety inspections, warning that unless it does so without delay it is unlikely to receive a building permit in 2018.

Helsingin Sanomat understands that Rosatom has provided at least some of the requisite documents but that the documents have been incomplete or failed to meet quality standards.

“What has been positive to notice is that Fennovoima has returned this material to Rosatom rather than sending it to us,” Janne Nevalainen, a project manager at STUK, commented to the newspaper.

Hemminki assures in the press release that the project is nevertheless moving in the right direction. The plant supplier and designer, he tells, have expedited the process considerably during the course of the summer by re-locating almost a hundred experts to Helsinki.

“Rosatom has built dozens of nuclear plants around the world, making it the world’s most experienced nuclear power plant supplier. I am therefore confident about the outcome. We have a massive advantage because the reference plant for Hanhikivi 1, LAES-2, will be completed next year in Sosnovy Bor, [Russia]. We will have all the latest information and experiences at our disposal in the construction phase,” he says.

Fennovoima filed its application for a building permit for the Hanhikivi Nuclear Power Plant in 2015.

Aleksi Teivainen – HT
Photo: Timo Heikkala – Lehtikuva
Source: Uusi Suomi

Partners