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Greece has done a lot to rectify the deficiencies in its asylum system and bring migrant flows at the EU's external borders under control, says Petri Sarvamaa (NCP), a Member of the European Parliament.
Greece has done a lot to rectify the deficiencies in its asylum system and bring migrant flows at the EU's external borders under control, says Petri Sarvamaa (NCP), a Member of the European Parliament.

Petri Sarvamaa (NCP), a Member of the European Parliament, has voiced his delight with news that the transfers of asylum seekers are to be resumed gradually under the Dublin Regulation as of 15 March, 2017.

“European immigration policy is finally starting to work,” he rejoices in a press release.

“Greece has done a lot to fix its asylum system and bring migrant flows at the external borders of the EU under control,” he states.

The European Commission recommended last week that the transfers of asylum seekers to Greece be resumed gradually due to the progress achieved by the country to put in place “the essential institutional and legal structures for a properly functioning asylum system”.

The situation at the external borders has also been mitigated by progress made in the implementation of the EU-Turkey Statement and measures adopted in Greece and Italy, according to the European Commission.

The progress represents an important step towards a regularly functioning Dublin Regulation and Schengen Area, says Frans Timmermans, the First Vice-President of the European Commission. “Our comprehensive European approach on migration is showing positive results. We can see this in the continued implementation of the EU-Turkey Statement and the dramatic decrease in the number of irregular migrants arriving in Greece,” he says in a press release from the European Commission.

The implementation of the migrant-exchange agreement has already brought down the number of irregular crossings of the Aegean Sea from a high of 10,000 in October, 2015, to an average of 90 per day since last March, according to the press release.

The so-called Dublin transfers were suspended due to deficiencies in the asylum system of Greece in 2011.

Sarvamaa reminds that the registration of asylum seekers is the not only the foundation of the European asylum system but also a precondition for the proper functioning of the Schengen Area. “European co-operation on immigration and migration policy is in the best interests of all of us,” he reminds. “It is sensible to help countries under severe pressure on the front-lines cope with the situation. Otherwise, the entire Europe could find itself in an uncontrollable state.”

Greece has received a total of 352 million euros in emergency funding to cope with the refugee crisis since early 2015.

Aleksi Teivainen – HT
Photo: Heikki Saukkomaa – Lehtikuva
Source: Uusi Suomi

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