#Xinjiang

  • Beijing to continue funding Xinjiang's education sector

    The municipal government of Beijing plans to invest about 1 billion yuan (around 153 million U.S. dollars) in funds this year to help improve education in northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region.

  • China-produced vaccines await approval by EU and WHO, will be 'major boon to the world'

    The European Medicines Agency (EMA) has started a rolling review of China's Sinovac COVID-19 vaccine, the EU's top drug regulator announced Tuesday, and experts said that once the vaccine is approved, China will further fulfill its international responsibilities as a major power and provide support to the international community in the pandemic fight.

    Sinovac and another China-produced COVID-19 jab, Sinopharm, are also under WHO assessment for emergency use, and results are anticipated in a week.

  • China: A role model for global poverty alleviation

    Poverty is a huge problem for countries all over the world, and poverty alleviation has long been a difficult task for the international community. People who live in extreme poverty are deprived of basic human needs such as food, clean drinking water, sanitation, hygiene, shelter, and education. The United Nations' Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) all prioritize eradicating poverty and hunger. Whether in its own modernization efforts or in implementing the UN's MDGs and SDGs, the Chinese government has always placed a high priority on poverty issues and actively investigated ways to alleviate poverty.

  • China's Xinjiang helps keep BRI trade afloat despite COVID-19

    At a naan-making industrial park in Horgos in northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, workers are busy making a popular staple food.

    Unlike most of the naan made elsewhere in Xinjiang, most of the round pancake-shaped bread is made for consumers in Central Asian countries.

  • Commentary: No more crocodile tears for China's Xinjiang

    Western politicians' accusations of human rights abuses against Uygurs in Xinjiang have picked up a higher pitch recently. These noises are, in fact, nothing more than hypocritical crocodile tears aimed at smearing China's image.

    And more importantly, they are crying over made-up stories that contain not a single shred of truth. The claim of "forced labor" underpinning a ban on imports of Xinjiang's cotton is groundless.

  • How Le Monde pretended a French reporter didn't exist

    Several days ago, French media outlet Le Monde ran a story claiming that China-based journalist Laurène Beaumond, who had contributed to CGTN's reporting on Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, apparently "did not exist," insinuating that she was a fictional and her story was fabricated for propaganda purposes.

    The claims gained specific traction on social media and were also pushed in a tweet by anti-China ideologue Adrian Zenz, who has been a key figure in pushing the U.S.-led Xinjiang narrative concerning events in the region.

  • Lies never able to cover truths

    A few countries in the west have been fabricating lies and spreading rumors about Xinjiang affairs to attack China's Xinjiang policy. However, most of the countries in the world believe that it is just a vicious tactic under the name of the so-called human rights to contain China's development and undermine the country's security and stability.

    Xinjiang-related issues are not human rights issues at all. They are in essence about countering violent terrorism, radicalization and separatism. There have never been such things as "genocide", "forced labor" or "religious oppression" in the autonomous region.

  • Quotable Quotes: Xi Jinping on national heroes, martyrs

    The 4th of April this year marks the Qingming Festival, an important day on the lunar calendar when Chinese people traditionally sweep the tombs of their deceased family members and pay tributes to their ancestors.

    During this day, Chinese people also pay respect to martyrs.

  • Senior Chinese diplomat holds phone conversation with U.S. secretary of state

    Yang Jiechi, a member of the Political Bureau of the Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Committee and director of the Office of the Foreign Affairs Commission of the CPC Central Committee, on Friday held a phone conversation with U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken at the latter's request.

    Noting that dialogue and cooperation should be the mainstay of China-U.S. relations, Yang said cooperation must be mutually beneficial and address each other's concerns in a balanced manner.

  • Transportation sector sees Qingming Festival rebound

    China's transportation sector witnessed a rebound during the three-day Tomb Sweeping Day holiday due to effective epidemic prevention and control measures across the country and the growing number of people receiving vaccinations.

    Tomb Sweeping Day, also known as Qingming Festival, fell on Sunday this year. Traditionally, it is the time when Chinese people commemorate the dead. It was also the first national holiday since Spring Festival, when people had been encouraged to stay put due to COVID-19 epidemic control measures.

  • U.S. profiting from the China-Australia rift it stirred up

    The U.S. will not leave Australia to face “China coercion” by itself. So claimed US Secretary of State Antony Blinken at a press briefing with his Aussie counterpart Marise Payne on May 14. Indeed, the U.S. has always stood by Australia’s side in forming their hatred-driven, anti-China alliance. But as Australia gets stuck in the pair’s morality play and Cold War mentality at the expense of its economic and diplomatic interests in China, its ally is speculating and profiting from the feud.

  • UK report interferes in China's internal affairs

    With geopolitics being high on the agenda of the G-7 Summit this weekend, the British government released on Thursday its so-called "six-month report on Hong Kong", lavishing aspersions on Beijing as well as the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region and providing much-needed ammunition for a new round of China bashing.

    But British Foreign Minister Dominic Raab must have disappointed his allies again in the ongoing China-bashing crusade by merely repeating his usual empty platitudes.

  • Western allegation of genocide in Xinjiang hardly convincing: Singaporean newspaper

    The Western allegation of so-called "genocide" in China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region lacks solid evidence and is therefore hardly convincing, said an opinion piece by Singapore's Chinese-language newspaper Lianhe Zaobao on Wednesday.

    Despite the overwhelming firepower of the Western propaganda war against China, the so-called "evidence" available to the West is very limited, consisting of only a few so-called leaked documents and one-sided statements by what Beijing calls separatists, said the article by Wu Jungang, a former member of Parliament of Singapore.

  • Witnessing the real Xinjiang, foreign diplomats debunk lies

    -- From March 30 to April 2, a delegation comprising Vladimir Norov, secretary-general of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization, and more than 30 diplomats from some 21 countries, visited Xinjiang.

    -- They talked with locals from various sectors of society, visited local schools and enterprises, and debunked rumors about Xinjiang, a region whose image is frequently distorted by some Western politicians, organizations and media.

  • Xinjiang attracts more investment

    Northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region attracted nearly 240 billion yuan (about 35.35 billion U.S. dollars) of investment via online platforms in the first eight months of the year, authorities said.

    According to the regional commerce department, investment totaling 237.2 billion yuan was attracted to the region from January to August, up 14.77 percent year on year.

  • Xinjiang cotton makes strong presence felt at China International Consumer Products Expo

    Products from northwest China’s Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region garnered a great deal of attention during the China International Consumer Products Expo (CICPE), an exhibition which ran from May 7 to 10 in Haikou, south China’s Hainan province.

    Information released on the website for the CICPE showed that a total of 184 companies from Xinjiang were present at the expo, including 48 from the Xinjiang Production and Construction Corps (XPCC), having exhibited textile products, agricultural products, and cultural and creative products, among others.

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