#U.S.

  • 'Lab leak' allegation nonsense, hinders global anti-COVID-19 cooperation: experts

    Unfounded allegations by some U.S. politicians that the COVID-19 virus escaped from a Chinese lab are making it harder for nations to collaborate on ending the pandemic and fueling online bullying, according to a recent news article in the British scientific journal Nature.

    "Even without strong supporting evidence," calls to investigate Chinese laboratories have reached a fever pitch in the United States, said the article, adding that for many researchers, the tone of the growing demands is unsettling, which could thwart efforts to study the virus's origins.

  • Across China: Tibetan children's author encourages early reading through picture books

     Opening a book decorated with simple pictures and written in the Tibetan language, Tatse introduces his latest work to readers.

    "This book is called 'My First Tibetan Alphabet Book,' and it teaches children the Tibetan language through pictures," said Tatse, 33.

  • Anti-China forces marshal new flawed tactics in fresh attempts to smear China on Xinjiang policy

    Anti-China forces are planning a new round of smearing campaigns against China's Xinjiang policy as the "Uyghur Tribunal," an organization formed by secessionists and Western anti-China forces in London, is about to hold what it terms as a first hearing of whether China's policy in Xinjiang is tantamount to genocide starting from Friday to Monday.

    "Such a 'tribunal' is neither legal nor credible. It is just another anti-China political farce concocted by a few people. It attempts to run in the name of "tribunal" to engage in anti-China political and public opinion manipulation. This is nothing but an insult on the law," Wang Wenbin, spokesperson of China's Foreign Ministry, said on Thursday.

  • Beijing slams Biden's curbs on firms

    China on Friday expressed opposition to United States President Joe Biden's expansion of restrictions on investments in certain Chinese companies and vowed to take necessary measures to safeguard the legitimate rights of Chinese enterprises.

    Biden signed an executive order on Thursday that prohibits US citizens from owning or trading any securities tied to 59 companies, citing alleged ties to China's military and the so-called threat posed by Chinese surveillance technology.

  • Benign interactions among major countries indispensable for tackling climate change

    Benign interactions between China and the U.S. in climate governance are highly anticipated as humanity is faced with mounting global climate change challenges and climate governance has entered a crucial stage.

    Climate change concerns the welfare of people around the world and mankind’s future. Various parties need to jointly address the issue with ambition and determination.

  • China being "coercive," say so the world's sole superpower

    Foreign ministers from the Group of Seven richest countries are finally having their first in-person meeting in two years in London, and apparently U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken will not miss out on this opportunity to peddle his "China threat" conspiracy.

    According to media reports, ministers from those like-minded countries joined a Tuesday morning session dedicated entirely to China, during which, with apparent maneuvering and guidance from the United States, they concluded by accusing China of being "coercive."

  • China ready to join Italy in pushing forward ties in right direction

    Chinese State Councilor and Foreign Minister Wang Yi said on Monday that China is ready to join Italy in pushing forward bilateral ties in the right direction for the better benefit of the two peoples, and greater contribution to world peace and development.

    In his phone talk with Italian Foreign Minister Luigi Di Maio, Wang said China appreciates Italy's adherence to its friendly policy towards China, adding that in the face of profound adjustment and transformation of the international situation, the Chinese side is willing to work with Italy to step up strategic communication, consolidate strategic mutual trust and get rid of all distractions.

  • China to relax foreign investment rules amid further opening up

    China will relax rules for foreign investment, increasing its market appeal to global investors and signaling its determination to deepen opening up.

    The country's Ministry of Commerce (MOC) has made public its plan for formulating regulations and laws in 2021, putting on agenda the revision of the guideline on foreign strategic investment in Chinese listed firms.

  • Chinese, U.S. senior officials hold phone talks over trade

    Chinese Vice Premier Liu He, a member of the Political Bureau of the Communist Party of China Central Committee and chief of the Chinese side of the China-U.S. comprehensive economic dialogue, held a phone conversation with U.S. Trade Representative Katherine Tai on Thursday morning.

  • Commentary: Anti-China bill detrimental to America's competitiveness

    The U.S. Senate on Tuesday passed an expansive bill that is apparently seeking to use an obsolete Cold-War mentality to boost America's future tech and manufacturing.

    The 2,400-plus-page bill shows Washington's growing anxiety over and ideological prejudice towards China's development, as well as its paranoia to maintain America's global technological superiority.

  • Commentary: China's anti-food waste law vital to ensure food security

     Chinese lawmakers on Thursday voted to adopt an anti-food waste law. The law, designed to help establish a long-term mechanism to prevent food waste, is vital to ensure national food security.

    Approximately 18 billion kg of food is wasted every year in China's urban catering industry, and over 35 billion kg of grain loss is estimated at pre-consumption stages including storage, transportation and processing, according to a report based on nationwide field research carried out by lawmakers.

  • Commentary: Why Kissinger's secret China visit still matters 50 years later

    Fifty years ago, then U.S. National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger undertook a secret mission to Beijing, which helped lay the groundwork for U.S. President Richard Nixon's ice-breaking China visit and the eventual normalization of relations between the two long-estranged countries.

    Fifty years later, the relationship between the world's top two economies now stands at another critical juncture because of an increasingly agitated Washington.

  • E-commerce brings profitable sales channels for Inner Mongolians

    Standing beside his profitable greenhouses, villager Xing Changqing still remembers that just five years ago, his farming business was impacted by the cheap prices of vegetables and fruits grown in his field.

    "Back then, fresh products during the harvest season were not only devalued but also hard to sell in traditional marketplaces," said Xing, 58, who lives in a village in Horqin Township, Horqin Right Wing Front Banner, north China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region.

  • G7 agrees on global minimum tax rate of at least 15 pct

    Calling it a "significant, unprecedented" commitment, U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said that the global minimum tax would end the race-to-the-bottom in corporate taxation, and ensure fairness for the middle class and working people in the United States and around the world.

    WASHINGTON, June 5 (Xinhua) -- The Group of Seven (G7) industrialized nations have agreed to support new rules that will achieve a global minimum tax rate of at least 15 percent, U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said Saturday.

  • Misguiding U.S. reports on COVID-19 origin sourcing hurt U.S. credibility

    The so-called "lab leak theory" recently fabricated by the U.S. is just lame. It followed the same old trick in which certain media outlets published biased reports and then some politicians hyped them up.

    However, such "comedy duo," which has been frequently staged, further revealed the ugly intention of the White House to politicize the pandemic and stigmatize other countries.

  • Nation's semiconductor industry at a turning point

    Recently, there has been much news about the global shortage of semiconductor chips. Some pundits have called it a crisis because China is the world's largest consumer of semiconductors, taking up more than 50 percent of the global supply, and yet its production of high-end chips is limited.

    United States sanctions on technology exports to China, as well as pandemic-related supply chain disruptions, have caused a severe chip shortage. Businesses and consumers around the world are now facing growing supply concerns.

  • No foreign interference able to undermine rule of law in Hong Kong

    The rule of law is never to be played with, and those who go against the laws shall never escape punishment.

    The District Court of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) recently sentenced Joshua Wong Chi-fung, an instigator of the Hong Kong riots, as well as other three persons, four to ten months in jail for participating in an unauthorized assembly.

  • Senior Chinese diplomat holds phone conversation with U.S. secretary of state

    Yang Jiechi, a member of the Political Bureau of the Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Committee and director of the Office of the Foreign Affairs Commission of the CPC Central Committee, on Friday held a phone conversation with U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken at the latter's request.

    Noting that dialogue and cooperation should be the mainstay of China-U.S. relations, Yang said cooperation must be mutually beneficial and address each other's concerns in a balanced manner.

  • U.S. profiting from the China-Australia rift it stirred up

    The U.S. will not leave Australia to face “China coercion” by itself. So claimed US Secretary of State Antony Blinken at a press briefing with his Aussie counterpart Marise Payne on May 14. Indeed, the U.S. has always stood by Australia’s side in forming their hatred-driven, anti-China alliance. But as Australia gets stuck in the pair’s morality play and Cold War mentality at the expense of its economic and diplomatic interests in China, its ally is speculating and profiting from the feud.

  • US interference in other countries' internal affairs aggravates chaos in Middle East

    The U.S. is an "expert" at interfering in the internal affairs of other countries, wantonly exercising its political power and hegemonism across the world.

    The U.S. regards the Middle East as its own "backyard" and pushes forward its "Greater Middle East" initiative for the democratic transformation under the slogan of "human rights overriding sovereignty".

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