#COVID-19

  • ‘Low risk of infection’ despite Qingdao receiving 4m passenger trips

    The city of Qingdao in East China's Shandong Province, where 12 people have tested positive for COVID-19 in a latest outbreak, announced that it received over 4.47 million passenger trips during the National Day holidays in early October, prompting concerns of epidemic spread, but locals and experts assured the public that the risk of wider spread of infections is low.

    The outbreak in Qingdao has a certain risk of spreading, public health experts reached by the Global Times warned, as a large number of tourists had been to the tourist city during the holidays, but the scope of spread should be limited and confined to people who had connection with the Qingdao Chest Hospital.

  • "Avatar" continues to lead China box office chart

    Re-released sci-fi blockbuster "Avatar" continued its dominance of the Chinese mainland box office chart on Wednesday, figures from the China Movie Data Information Network showed Thursday.

    Directed by James Cameron, the Oscar-winning film was renowned for its fascinating visual effects. It generated a daily box office of more than 6.3 million yuan (about 960,000 U.S. dollars) on its 13th day of re-release in China.

  • "Three cattle spirit" steers China to bullish Year of the Ox

    China is ringing in the Year of the Ox, a new beginning of great significance for both the Chinese people and the Communist Party of China (CPC) that has led the whole nation to overcome many challenges, including COVID-19. The new year will also be defined by the "three cattle spirit."

    The term first appeared in Chinese President Xi Jinping's speech at a New Year's gathering late last December held in Beijing by the National Committee of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference. It was later repeated in his Spring Festival greetings to all Chinese on behalf of the CPC Central Committee and the State Council on Wednesday.

  • 2020 China Journal: What happened in the country this year? (4)

    Fun cultural phenomena during the pandemic: unbearable imps, humble brags and the young Tibetan star

    During the first months of 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic forced people to stay indoors as much as possible. In certain cities which were recognized by health authorities as high-risk areas, quarantine and home-isolation were imposed on citizens to avoid unnecessary contact.

  • 2020 China Journal: What happened in the country this year?(1)

    2020 has been a tough year. The COVID-19 pandemic, which has swept the whole world and has wreaked havoc in every aspect of our lives, has brought negativity and great loss to us all. Out of sorrow and difficulties grow miracles and hope. Though China was struck heavily by the virus during its early stage, with great efforts made by the selfless public and efficient government, the pandemic is now under control. What happened in China during the pandemic? How did the pandemic affect Chinese people’s lives? What is the secret behind China’s success to curb the spread of COVID-19? From our 2020 journal, you may find the answers.

  • 2020 China Journal: What happened in the country this year?(2)

    Unity is strength: Public efforts to tackle COVID-19

    On January 18, 2020, on a high-speed train to Wuhan, one of the world's most populous cities, people were chatting excitedly. A festive atmosphere filled the air, as passengers could not wait to get back for the Chinese Lunar New Year. None of them could know that in just a few days, their destination would become a forbidden zone plagued by a novel coronavirus.

  • American economist debunks “China threat” theory, calls for closer China-US cooperation

    China is less a competitor and more a wannabe of the world, and the United States and China should learn from each other’s strengths and weaknesses to achieve prosperous coexistence, said American economist Richard Wolff.

    In a video of Richard Wolff’s radio program Economic Update posted on Aug. 24, 2020, the professor rejected the demonization of China, noting that China and the United States have more similarities than many would realize.

  • Amnesty analysis reveals over 7,000 health workers have died from COVID-19

    New analysis by Amnesty International has found that at least 7,000 health workers have died around the world after contracting COVID-19. At least 1,320 health workers are confirmed to have died in Mexico alone, the highest known figure for any country. 

    Amnesty International also recorded high numbers of health worker deaths in the USA (1,077) and Brazil (634), where infection and death rates have been high throughout the pandemic, as well as alarming figures in South Africa (240) and India (573), where infection rates have soared in recent months. 

  • Anti-China bias "has blinded too many for too long to opportunities": UK newspaper

    The anti-China bias "has blinded too many for too long to opportunities" in a changing world, a major British newspaper has reported.

    "The world order is changing, yet many are missing this because of a persistent anti-China bias," said the Financial Times in a recent opinion article.

  • Beijing to continue funding Xinjiang's education sector

    The municipal government of Beijing plans to invest about 1 billion yuan (around 153 million U.S. dollars) in funds this year to help improve education in northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region.

  • Benefits of AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine outweigh risks: WHO

    The World Health Organization's Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) said on Wednesday that the benefits of the AstraZeneca/Oxford University COVID-19 vaccine outweigh the potential risks.

    "The data reviewed by WHO support the conclusion that the known and potential benefits of AZD1222 outweigh the known and potential risk," SAGE said in a set of interim recommendations.

  • Chengdu 2021 Universiade recruits 3,000 key volunteers

    Chengdu in southwest China’s Sichuan province has recruited 3,000 key volunteers for the 31st Summer World University Games, or Universiade, from 50,000 applicants in the host city’s 44 colleges and universities.

    A total of 50 training courses were offered in five batches for these volunteers. In April, the city launched the first online test for them, with a pass rate of 98 percent.

  • China addresses disparities in COVID-19 vaccine distribution

    -- In the face of production shortfalls across the world, some rich countries are hoarding vaccines, leaving poorer ones defenseless in the face of the deadly pathogen. As of mid-January, high-income countries, which represent only 16 percent of the world's population, had taken 60 percent of available doses.

    -- Experts said closing the immunity gap is not only about morality and conscience, but also the key to stopping the pandemic by cutting risk of more new variants.

  • China approves patent to COVID-19 vaccine

    China has granted its first COVID-19 vaccine patent to the adenovirus vector vaccine developed by Chen Wei of the Academy of Military Medical Sciences and Chinese biotech company CanSino Biologics, according to the National Intellectual Property Administration.

    The patent was submitted for application on March 18, and was approved on Aug 11, according to the patent document.

  • China at Davos: A steady voice for multilateralism

    “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.” Four years ago in Davos, President Xi Jinping quoted this famous line of Charles Dickens to describe a world fraught with contradictions. He observed, “On the one hand, with growing material wealth and advances in science and technology, human civilization has developed as never before. On the other hand, frequent regional conflicts, global challenges like terrorism and refugees, as well as poverty, unemployment and widening income gap have all added to the uncertainties of the world.”

  • China enhances efforts to build fairer education environment

    Education is a fundamental solution to the intergenerational transmission of poverty, and higher education remains a vital part of the solution.

    According to China's Ministry of Education, a total of 5.14 million registered impoverished students have received higher education since November 2012, and the number is growing annually.

  • China is exporting COVID-19 vaccines to 27 countries

    China is exporting COVID-19 vaccines to 27 countries and providing free vaccine aid to 53 countries in need, foreign ministry spokesperson Wang Wenbin said on Tuesday.

    Wang told a press briefing that vaccine aid from China has arrived in Pakistan, Cambodia, Laos, Equatorial Guinea, Zimbabwe, Mongolia and Belarus, and that vaccine exports from China have arrived in Serbia, Hungary, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Colombia, Morocco, Senegal, UAE, and Turkey.

  • China launches Clean Plate Campaign 2.0 as Xi calls for end to food wastage

    A few years after the "Clean Your Plate Campaign" launched in 2013, its 2.0 version is arriving. Different from the previous campaign, which was aimed at putting an end to officials' extravagant feasts and receptions, the 2.0 version calls for the public to stop wasting food. The initiative initially sparked speculation by some media over whether China is in a food crisis. Experts say the world indeed faces a food shorage, but for China, the real threat to food security comes more from food wastage than epidemic or floods.

    President Xi Jinping stressed the need to maintain a sense of crisis on food security despite the consecutive bumper harvests, and urged the establishment of a long-term mechanism to stop wasting food amid the fallout from the epidemic.

    Xi, also general secretary of the Communist Party of China Central Committee, said that food wastage is shocking and distressing, and that it is necessary to further enhance public awareness of the issue, cultivate thrifty habits, and foster a social environment where waste is shameful and thriftiness is good.

    Despite media hype that China is in a looming food crisis, which is worsened by the epidemic, floods in southern China, and food imports, Chinese agriculturalists said the above factors will not lead to a food crisis in China, but that wasting food is an issue that deserves more attention.

    China's food security was not seriously affected by COVID-19, and China's grain reserves are ample, Zheng Fengtian, a professor at Renmin University of China's School of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development, told the Global Times on Wednesday.

  • China regards people’s health as foundation for human civilization and social progress

    People’s health is the foundation for human civilization and social progress, and a significant symbol of national prosperity and strength, Chinese President Xi Jinping noted on March 6.

    Xi, also general secretary of the Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Committee, made the remarks when he visited national political advisors from education, medical and health sectors attending a joint group meeting at the fourth session of the 13th National Committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC), China’s top political advisory body, in Beijing, capital of China. Xi joined them in the discussion and heard their comments and suggestions.

  • China starts Chinese Lunar New Year with record box office receipts

    China shot straight out of the box office gate with a new record as Spring Festival or Chinese Lunar New year was celebrated on Friday.

    China's box office takings on Spring Festival, which fell on Feb 12 this year, topped 1.7 billion yuan (about $264 million), according to figures released by the China Film Administration.

    The figure surpassed the 1.4 billion yuan generated on Spring Festival two years ago, achieving a new Chinese daily box office milestone.

    The weeklong Spring Festival holiday, usually a busy moviegoing period in China, started on Feb 11.

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