Minister of Social Affairs and Health Aino-Kaisa Pekonen (Left Alliance) says the government is proud to be able to propose a sizeable increase in small pensions. (Mikko Stig – Lehtikuva)

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OVER 600,000 Finnish pensioners are set to see a small increase in their pensions under a draft bill unveiled by the government on Wednesday.

The Ministry of Social Affairs and Health has asked experts and other stakeholders to comment on the proposal for raising national pensions by up to 31 euros a month and guarantee pensions by up to 50 euros a month.

The net increases would be paid to pensioners with monthly pensions lower than 1,200–1,300 euros, with lowest-earning pensioners being entitled to the full 50-euro increase and higher-earning ones to smaller increases. A total of 609,000 pensioners are estimated to benefit from the proposal.

“We are delighted and proud to be able to propose a sizeable, 50-euro increase in small pensions. This proposal would extend the increase to those whose daily lives would be the most strongly impacted by the additional money,” commented Aino-Kaisa Pekonen (Left Alliance), the Minister of Social Affairs and Health.

The press release also indicates that the increases would be carried out in a way that they would only have a small impact on the housing allowances of pensioners.

Helsingin Sanomat on Wednesday wrote that the increase would be 50 euros for pensioners with monthly earnings not exceeding 835 euros, roughly 31 euros for pensioners with earnings of 835–987 euros, roughly 19 euros for pensioners with earnings of 987–1,188 euros and roughly 18 euros for pensioners with earnings of 1,188–1,288 euros.

The Finnish government earmarked a total of 183 million euros a year for raising lowest pensions in its government programme. Prime Minister Antti Rinne (SDP) famously promised more than a year ago at the start of his successful election campaign to raise pensions not exceeding 1,400 euros a month by 100 euros over a several-year period.

Aleksi Teivainen – HT
Source: Uusi Suomi

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