Antti Rinne, the chairperson of the Social Democrats, presented his list of questions for the coalition formation process to other parties on Friday, 26 April. (Antti Aimo-Koivisto – Lehtikuva)

Politics
Tools
Typography

ANTTI RINNE, the chairperson of the Social Democratic Party, has denied suggestions that he drafted his 10-item list of questions for the coalition formation process in a way that rules out the Finns Party.

The first section of the list deals with measures to achieve carbon neutrality and protect biodiversity in Finland.

Related posts:

“Are you committed to limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees worldwide? Are you committed to making Finland carbon neutral by 2035 and carbon negative soon thereafter? What kinds of measures do you think will be needed in different sectors of society to combat climate change? What do you consider key measures to protect and improve biodiversity?”

Rinne on Saturday reminded YLE that all parliamentary groups committed last autumn to both limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees and becoming carbon neutral by 2035 in a joint statement championed by Prime Minister Juha Sipilä (Centre). The Finns Party abandoned the parliamentary task force a week before the statement was unveiled, arguing that the goals were too ambitious.

“I truly hope that all parties are committed to answering these questions seriously with the intention of making themselves available for the government. This includes the Finns Party,” Rinne stated on YLE TV1.

Rinne declined to speculate on the possible composition of the next government but revealed that he intends to form a majority government that has “well over a hundred” seats in the Finnish Parliament.

The other political parties have also been asked to, for example, reveal how they would develop working life in co-operation with labour market organisations, lay out measures for raising the employment rate to 75 per cent, shed light on their vision for developing the European Union, and comment on how they would promote the realisation of human rights in Finland.

Aleksi Teivainen – HT
Source: Uusi Suomi