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Antti Rinne, the chairperson of the Social Democrats, is currently the frontrunner to lead the next coalition formation negotiations, suggests the latest opinion poll commissioned by YLE.
Antti Rinne, the chairperson of the Social Democrats, is currently the frontrunner to lead the next coalition formation negotiations, suggests the latest opinion poll commissioned by YLE.

 

Each of Finland’s three most supported political parties saw its popularity increase between early July and early August, according to the latest opinion poll by YLE.

The Social Democratic Party consolidated its position as the most supported party in the country over the past month or so by registering an up-tick of 0.9 percentage points in popular support to 21.2 per cent – a reading that represents an increase of 5.6 percentage points from mid-2017.

“It’s now fair to say the SDP is currently the most popular party in Finland,” Tuomo Turja, a research director at Taloustutkimus, commented to YLE.

“The SDP’s growing popularity may partly be about people jumping on the bandwagon. With the SDP being by far the largest opposition party, it’s easy think that you should vote for the SDP,” added Turja.

The National Coalition Party trails the opposition party by 1.4 percentage points after its popularity crept up by 0.1 percentage points to 19.8 per cent. The Centre Party, in turn, saw its popularity to increase by 1.2 percentage points to 17.8 per cent as especially ageing voters declared their support for the party.

The Green League, the Finns Party and the Left Alliance all saw their popularity fade – the first by 0.3 percentage points to 13.6 per cent, the second by 1.6 percentage points to 8.7 per cent and the third by 0.9 percentage points to 7.7 per cent.

The Blue Reform, meanwhile, slipped ever closer to political oblivion as support for the newly founder party fell by 0.3 percentage points to 0.8 per cent.

“The Blue Reform’s future looks to be rather blues-focused. The question will be what kind of candidates it’s able to nominate especially in Uusimaa. That’s where the its future as a parliamentary party will be decided,” viewed Turja.

The Swedish People’s Party registered an up-tick of 1.0 percentage points in popular support to 4.3 per cent and the Christian Democrats one of 0.2 percentage points to 3.8 per cent, according to the public broadcasting company.

Taloustutkimus interviewed a total of 2,452 people for the poll between 9 July and 7 August. Roughly three-fifths (1,501) of respondents were able and willing to disclose which party they would vote for if the parliamentary elections were held today.

The poll has a margin of error of +/-2.1 percentage points.

Aleksi Teivainen – HT
Photo: Roni Rekomaa – Lehtikuva
Source: Uusi Suomi