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Jussi Halla-aho, the chairperson of the Finns Party, insists that there is no reason to panic despite the fact that the populist opposition party seems to have lost almost a third of its support in October.
Jussi Halla-aho, the chairperson of the Finns Party, insists that there is no reason to panic despite the fact that the populist opposition party seems to have lost almost a third of its support in October.

 

The Finns Party has lost almost a third of its support over the past month, finds a poll commissioned by YLE.

YLE on Thursday reported that voter support for the opposition party plummeted by 3.0 percentage points to 6.9 per cent – its lowest level in over seven years – in October, as voters shifted their support for the Social Democrats and National Coalition.

“That’s really a significant drop. It’s rare to see changes in the region of three percentage points,” Jari Pajunen, the chief executive of Taloustutkimus, commented to YLE.

Taloustutkimus interviewed a total of 2,448 people for the opinion poll between 4 and 31 October. The Finns Party’s skid, thus, falls well outside the margin of error for the poll, +/-2.1 percentage points.

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Jussi Halla-aho, the chairperson of the Finns Party, admitted to being surprised by the poll results but insisted that there is no reason to panic.

“The result was surprising but it’s difficult to say anything insightful about it until we’ve look at the poll’s raw data. There’s on reason to panic, however. The party members have been in high spirits, and studies indicate that there’s demand for our political agenda,” he wrote on Facebook.

“We have to focus on what we’re doing and keep doing what we know is right.”

The Finns Party was not the only party to record a substantial change in voter support, according to the public broadcasting company. The Green League saw its support drop by 2.6 percentage points to 14.0 per cent, as it continued its skid for the second consecutive month after taking over as the most supported opposition party in August.

The Green League was polling at a record-high level of 17.6 per cent between July and August.

The National Coalition and Social Democrats, the latest poll also shows, both recorded an up-tick of 1.1 percentage points in voter support to 22.8 and 18.4 per cent, respectively, as the former consolidated its status as the most and the latter the second most supported political party in Finland.

The Centre Party, in turn, rebounded after seeing its support slip to its lowest level since mid-2012, recording an increase of 1.6 percentage points to 17.4 per cent.

The Left Alliance recorded a 0.7 percentage point rise in support, to 9.0 per cent, and overtook the Finns Party as the third most supported opposition party after the Social Democrats and Green League.

The Swedish People’s Party was the only smaller party to record a notable increase, of 1.4 percentage points, in voter support, receiving 4.9 per cent of the hypothetical vote.

The Christian Democratic Party contrastively saw its popularity wane by 0.5 percentage points to 3.4 per cent and the Blue Reform – the smallest of the three ruling parties – by 0.2 percentage points to 1.3 per cent, according to YLE.

Aleksi Teivainen – HT
Photo: Emmi Korhonen – Lehtikuva
Source: Uusi Suomi