Following the announcement that Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin are to meet in Helsinki in July, The Atlantic takes a look at the history of the Finnish capital as a site of pivotal encounters between the United States and Russia.

 

Starting during the Cold War, Helsinki has a long history of playing host to important meetings between American and Russian presidents. The Atlantic places Trump and Putin’s upcoming summit in its historical context.

Despite not qualifying for the tournament, the World Cup has also brought some international news to Finland. The Telegraph has reported that prospective asylum seekers have bought tickets in order to attempt to cross the border from Russia to Finland.

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The Washington Post has reported that US military chief Gen. Joseph Dunford, left, will meet his Russian counterpart in Helsinki to discuss “current issues between the countries.”

 

As was reported last month, interest from non-EU students towards Finnish universities has hit an “all-time low”. Study International takes a closer look at just why this is the case.

This week also saw the story of Afghan migrant Mojtaba Hassani cause a stir in the international media. TOLOnews has reported that the 21-year-old is due to be deported by the Finnish police, despite the fact he has a full-time job.

In other news, Helsinki will play host to an important military meeting, Chinese money is being sought to fund the Helsinki-Estonia tunnel, and Finnish startup Space Nation has designed the world’s first astronaut training app.

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The Daily Mail has reported that more than £2.5 million of fur items have been imported into the UK from Finland over the last five years.

 

Although campaigners have been calling for fur farming to be banned from Finland, the country was responsible for around 2.4 million foxes being farmed for their fur in 2016. Images taken last year by Justice for Animals, a Finnish animal rights group, show the price that Arctic foxes have to pay to fuel Finland’s fur industry.

In other news, Finland is ranked as having the best education system in the world relative to GDP per capita, while Glamour magazine celebrates the Finnish “wellness trend” of Päntsdrunk.

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Following US President Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal, Sauli Niinistö said the fallout could badly hurt transatlantic relations.

 While Finland always seems to rank highly in international polls related to education, happiness and healthcare, apparently Finns are more interested in pointing out their failures than celebrating their successes. Mother Nature Network wonders why Finland is so indifferent about being called the best.

In other news, Finnish President Sauli Niinistö is concerned about transatlantic relations after the U.S. withdrawal from the Iran nuclear deal, while the BBC wonders why a Finnish father of six has decided to give his children total freedom.

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Finance Minister Petteri Orpo told the Financial Times that Finland’s universal basic income trial led to people becoming “passive”.

 

The Finnish government’s decision to end their two-year basic income trial has been a major talking point over the last few weeks. Speaking in a recent interview with the Financial Times, Finance Minister Petteri Orpo told the newspaper that Finland’s current system was making people “passive”.

In other news, the Supreme Court of Finland decided to uphold the conviction of aggravated sexual abuse against a man who had sexual intercourse with a 10-year-old girl near Tampere in the autumn of 2016. Critics believe that the offence should be regarded as rape.

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A new study has claimed that supporters of populist and far-right parties, such as Finland First, are more likely to be bitter and resentful than supporters of mainstream parties.

 

Bitter people who feel that they have not received what they deserve in life worry more about immigration, according to a forthcoming study from the European Journal of Political Economy. “This relationship holds for respondents with different levels of skills, job security, concerns about crime, the general economic situation, or their own economic situation,” says Panu Poutvaara, Director of the ifo Center for International Institutional Comparisons and Migration Research.

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Kela has challenged claims made by Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon that baby boxes can reduce infant mortality.

 

Although it was recently reported that Finland has decided to “scrap” its experiment with universal basic income, The Economist has reported that the truth is not quite so simple. According to the weekly news magazine, the trial is not necessarily viewed by Kela as a failure and was always due to finish after two years.

Elsewhere, Kela has refuted claims made by the Scottish government that baby boxes can help to reduce infant mortality, while The Times has reported that Finland is set to share its citizens’ private data with professionals, researchers and pharmaceutical companies in order to offer more personalised healthcare.

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To celebrate Earth Day, Finland’s first-ever commercial satellite released some fascinating images of the Earth’s surface.

 

The Finnish government’s decision to ends its experiment with universal basic income caught the attention of much of the world’s international media this week. In response to the news, The New York Times takes a look at why it failed to work in Finland.

Elsewhere, Bloomberg analyses the hacker-proof digital highway that has opened between Finland and Estonia, while Business Insider Nordic shows us some images of the Earth taken by Finland’s ICEYE satellite.

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The Guardian has reported that the British government should learn from Finland’s policy of providing homes to homeless people.

 

While homelessness in Finland has fallen by 35% since 2010, in the UK it has increased by more than 100% over a similar time period. This has encouraged The Guardian to get behind the idea of Britain adopting Finland’s simple solution to the problem.

In the business world, Finnish startups raised a record €349 million in investments over the course of 2017. Despite this success being attributed to Finland’s “world-class gaming industry”, Pocket Gamer.biz has reported that Finnish mobile gaming is actually stagnating.

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CAP's driving simulator is taken for a spin by Regional Manager Markus Vanhala.

 

Getting a driving licence in Finland requires attending an officially recognised school, but the problem for immigrants is that almost all driving schools teach in Finnish. CAP is a welcome exception.

CAP is Finland’s largest driving school. Providing five-star training to companies, individuals and the Finnish Defence Forces since 2005, the company’s wide range of courses cater to international students and learners of all abilities. Whether pupils are getting to grips with a scooter, a heavy truck or something in between, CAP is sure to have the ideal course for you in one of its 70+ nationwide locations.

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A photo dated 29 July, 2005, showing a parking meter in Helsinki.
A photo dated 29 July, 2005, showing a parking meter in Helsinki.

 

The City of Turku is believed to have lost a minimum of hundreds of thousands of euros because of a couple of pilfering employees.

The National Bureau of Investigation (KRP) on Wednesday revealed that two people employed by the city are suspected of embezzling and stealing a considerable sum of money while performing their official duties – emptying parking meters.

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