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Sunbathers in Hietaniemi, Helsinki, on 24 August 2018. The month’s mean temperature was 1–3 degrees higher than usual, according to the Finnish Meteorological Institute. (Credit: Vesa Moilanen – Lehtikuva)
Sunbathers in Hietaniemi, Helsinki, on 24 August 2018. The month’s mean temperature was 1–3 degrees higher than usual, according to the Finnish Meteorological Institute. (Credit: Vesa Moilanen – Lehtikuva)

 

This summer was approximately 2ºC warmer than usual, according to the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI).

FMI on Monday reported that temperatures as high as those recorded over the past three months are witnessed once every 20–30 years. The summer was even more unusual in some areas: it was the hottest in the 174-year history of the weather station in Kaisaniemi, Helsinki, and the second hottest in the 118-year history of the weather station in Sodankylä, Lapland.

If May is also taken into consideration, this summer was the warmest on record both nationwide and at individual weather stations in Finland, with the mean temperature being as much as 0.3ºC higher than in what is now the second warmest summer on record, the summer of 1937.

FMI revealed that the highest temperature of 33.7ºC was recorded in Klemettilä, Vaasa, on 18 July. The reading is the second highest for at least 60 years, second only to the 37.2ºC recorded in Joensuu in 2010.

The mercury breached the 25ºC-mark on roughly 40 days in southern parts of the country and on 20 days in Lapland. The number of such days was 10–30 higher than usual depending on the locality, with the highest number (46) being recorded in Heinola.

FMI points out that the summer was record-breaking almost all over the Baltics and Nordics.

In Norway, for example, the summer was the hottest and driest in the over 100-year measurement history. In Latvia, May was the warmest on record, while both June and July were similarly warmer than usual.

“There will be more and more record-breaking weather events in the future. That is why the society must prepare for a changing climate, where weather phenomena that are currently considered unusual, such as heat waves, downpours and urban flooding, become increasingly commonplace,” says Juhani Damski, the director general at FMI.

“Weather and climate change are global phenomena. That is why wide-ranging international collaboration is needed,” he adds.

Aleksi Teivainen – HT