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Ilkka Kaukoranta, the chief economist at the Central Organisation of Finnish Trade Unions (SAK), says the government still has time to change its mind about a proposal that would make it easier for small businesses to lay off employees. (Credit: Heikki Saukkomaa – Lehtikuva)
Ilkka Kaukoranta, the chief economist at the Central Organisation of Finnish Trade Unions (SAK), says the government still has time to change its mind about a proposal that would make it easier for small businesses to lay off employees. (Credit: Heikki Saukkomaa – Lehtikuva)

 

The Finnish government decided not to scrap its proposal to undermine the protection against unilateral termination of employees at small businesses in its newly completed budget session despite the demands and threats of trade union confederations.

Its proposal would make it easier for businesses with no more than 20 employees to lay off employees on personal grounds.

The Central Organisation of Finnish Trade Unions (SAK), the Finnish Confederation of Salaried Employees (STTK) and the Confederation of Unions for Professional and Managerial Staff in Finland (Akava) have all expressed their opposition to the proposal. SAK declared a couple of weeks ago that it will introduce workplace-specific measures unless the government abandons the proposal.

Ilkka Kaukoranta, the chief economist at SAK, told Uusi Suomi on Wednesday that the central organisation will continue to lobby against the proposal and determine its course of action in a meeting of its executive board next week.

“That’s where we’ll plan our response to [the proposal],” he told.

Kaukoranta confirmed that the measures under consideration include strikes but stressed that the response may range from a few-hour work stoppage to a more widespread strike.

“Yes, [there will be strikes] if the government stubbornly moves forward with this,” he stated.

The Legislation Assessment Council is examining the impacts of the proposal. Kaukoranta believes if the council sided against the proposal, it would offer the government yet another opportunity to scrap the proposal.

“That’d be another opportunity for the government to backtrack on its decision. No bill has yet been presented to the Parliament. The government still has time to change its mind,” he said.

Aleksi Teivainen – HT
Source: Uusi Suomi